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 2008 Articles

Click here for entire Bruschi Article Archive

Notes and Quotes

First Day of Camp 07/24/08

“I think the biggest thing I can say is how you move on from a season is that after we’ve won, we’ve never dwelled on it either. So we’re not going to dwell on it when we lost,” linebacker Tedy Bruschi said. “So it’s going to be the same. We never strutted our stuff around here after we’ve won Super Bowls, because we’ve forgotten about them, instantaneously, once we came in for training camp because we know there was work to be done. It’s the same thing.”

Tedy Bruschi looks ahead
Moves on in playbook
By Steve Buckley | Friday, July 25, 2008 | http://www.bostonherald.com | Columnists


FOXBORO - Take away the shoulder pads and the playbooks, the two-a-day practices and the one-a-day media sessions, and guess what: Football players are just a bunch of guys.

As if we needed that reminder, they are human, with human emotions. So when members of the Patriots [team stats] stick with the Bill Belichick-issued script and tell you how they have seamlessly and effortlessly moved on from their loss to the New York Giants in last season’s Super Bowl . . . well, it’s simply not that easy. They’re human, remember?

And if there’s one member of the Patriots capable of addressing this issue with intelligence and candor, partnered with going on 13 years of playing experience, it is, of course, Tedy Bruschi .

Sporting a summer buzzcut that made him look more like one of the original Mercury astronauts than a veteran football player, Bruschi held court with a crowd of sportswriters behind Gillette Stadium yesterday morning, this after the first practice of the first day of training camp.

Guess what? It only took about six seconds before someone asked him about the Patriots’ 17-14 loss to the Giants in Super Bowl XLII.

Guess what? Bruschi is in agreement with the cold, hard reality that a new training camp does not, in and of itself, wipe away the hurt from old Super Bowls.

“It’s tough to put seasons behind you after you win Super Bowls or after you lose Super Bowls,” said Bruschi, who has experience with both. “Moving on is something that takes lots of experience, a lot of maturity. And I think all of us have been around on this team to where I think we’re just looking forward.”

The key word here is experience. Had last year’s Patriots been all new and shiny to the world of postseason football, one could only imagine the ghosts that would have been haunting them in the offseason. Had they been, say, a collection of upstarts who sneaked into the playoffs and made it to the Super Bowl only to suffer a crushing defeat, and then never returned, now that would have been something.

Talk to old-timers from the 1985 Patriots and a lot of ’em are still smoldering over their lopsided loss to the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XX.

It was their one shot. By the time the Patriots returned to the Super Bowl a decade later, the Hannahs and Grogans, the Nelsons and Clayborns, the Morgans and Tippetts, had moved on to the nonplaying chapter of their lives. The Pats were one-and-done against the Denver Broncos the season after Super Bowl XX, and they wouldn’t get another playoff date until Bill Parcells thundered into town, losing to Belichick’s Cleveland Browns in 1994.

These guys really are different. Many of them know the thrill of winning a Super Bowl, and now, most of them know the heartbreak of losing one.

Bruschi is more grizzled than most: He was a rookie when the ’96 Patriots lost to Green Bay in Super Bowl XXXI, and then he played on three Super Bowl-winning teams. And, of course, there was last season.

So, yes, when talk turns to “dealing with” losing the Super Bowl, and about “celebrating” a Super Bowl and about “looking ahead” after a Super Bowl, we should be listening to an expert. We should be listening to Tedy Bruschi.

And yesterday, judging from the crowd that formed around him, most people did. Heck, Bruschi used the term “move on” so often that after a while it started to sound like “Mo Vaughn.”

“Every season, when you don’t consider it a success, that’s when you really have to move on,” he said. “And I’ve been a part of 13 seasons now whether they’ve been successes or they haven’t been. I’ve had both of them. Either way, you have to learn to do that, and I think experience does help to really put it behind you and look toward tomorrow.

“There are really just two words - what’s next,” he said.

“And what’s next for us is meetings at 2:30, and another practice out here this afternoon. That’s really how ritualistic you have to be. What’s next. Literally. OK, right now I’m going to the ice tub. That’s what’s next.”

Tedy Bruschi looks ahead - BostonHerald.com


Bruschi old faithful for Patriots

By Glen Farley
ENTERPRISE STAFF WRITER
Posted Jul 26, 2008 @ 09:50 PM


FOXBORO —

‘The fire’s still there’ for Tedi Bruschi entering his 13th season

The Thursday morning wakeup call came rather early, although perhaps not early enough for Tedy Bruschi. “You’ve got to wake up, it’s 6 in the morning, put on shoulder pads and a helmet and go out there and hit 300-pound men that outweigh you and are bigger and stronger than you,” the New England Patriots inside linebacker said. “Do you want to do that?”

The 35-year-old Bruschi then answered his own question.

“The decision was easy for me,” he said. “When I put on my helmet (for the start of training camp), I wanted to.

“ The hunger’s still there. The fire’s still there. It’s something that I want to keep on doing.”

The 6-foot-1, 247-pound Bruschi has been doing this in New England since 1996, the last of Bill Parcells’ four years with the Patriots, when the team made him a third-round pick out of the University of Arizona.

“I know what to do now,” Bruschi answered when asked the difference between him at a younger age and today. “When I was younger, you’re sort of running around in circles at times.”

Now, with 1,063 tackles to his credit, including 99 last season, Bruschi figures his career has done a 180-degree turnaround.

“I know what some of these rookies are going through,” Bruschi said, speaking in the tone of a sage veteran. “I made one of the rookies carry my pads back in (from practice). I said, ‘It’s been 13 years since I carried Willie McGinest’s pads inside so join the club.’ There you go.”

While experiencing the trials and tribulations that more than a decade in one place can bring, Bruschi has had a good run in these parts.

Bruschi went to the Super Bowl as a role player his rookie year with a Patriots team that lost, 35-21, to Green Bay.

Then, its coach, Parcells, left for the New York Jets and took his right-hand man, Bill Belichick, with him.

After the year-by-year demise the Pete Carroll era brought and a 5-11 finish under Belichick in 2000, he went back to three more Super Bowls with the Patriots as an integral part of the team and won.

He enjoyed a Pro Bowl season in 2004 only to suffer a stroke three days after taking part in the game.

He played in his fifth Super Bowl in February, experiencing a stunning loss to the New York Giants from which his team is now looking to rebound.

“After we’ve won, we’ve never dwelled on it, either, so we’re not going to dwell on it when we’ve lost.” Bruschi insisted. “It’s just going to be the same.

“We never strutted our stuff around here after we’ve won Super Bowls because we’ve forgotten about them. (Win or lose), there’s work to be done.”

Bruschi continued to do that work in the wake of Super Bowl XLII, emerging as one of the Patriots’ offseason award winners due to his commitment during the team’s “down time.”

So, what keeps Bruschi going long after every other member of the Patriots’ 13-man draft class of 1996 (Terry Glenn, Lawyer Milloy, Heath Irwin, Chris Sullivan, Kantroy Barber, John Elmore, Christian Peter, Chris Griffin, Marrio Grier, Devin Wyman, Lovett Purnell and J.R. Conrad) has either long since moved on from New England or long since moved out of the NFL?

“Winning games feels good and you want to have that good feeling after games,” said Bruschi. “I know what it’s like to be in a locker room and you’ve won a game and the feeling you have as a team.

“The best goals are the ones that you accomplish with other people.

“To win a football game, you play one a week. So that feeling is something you want to continue.”

Entering his ninth season under Belichick, Bruschi looks to continue in a program he bought into long ago.

“The way Coach Belichick preaches one practice at a time, one day at a time, one game at a time is the way a lot of us veterans also live our lives,” said Bruschi. “That’s the way I feel. That’s the way I’ve been.

“When you have players who are (in sync) with the attitudes of the head coach, it’s a good match. And it’s easy to get messages across to the younger players.”

Bruschi old faithful for Patriots - Brockton, MA - The Enterprise

Tedy Bruschi Q&A, 7/29

Posted on July 29, 2008



Tedy Bruschi spoke with the media for a few moments after the morning walkthrough at Gillette Stadium. Here’s a small portion of his Q&A with reporters:

Is this where you thought you’d be five days into camp?
Yeah, yeah. It’s about normal. You’ve got the aches and pains. You spend your time in the ice tub and you try to get your legs back as soon as possible. You just keep pushing through. You know it’s the toughest, toughest month of the job — the preseason games, the training camp. It’s just something you have to do.

Shorts regular for this time of year?
Yeah, we got a little bone today. We got a little bone today with the walk through. We’ve been working hard out here — we’ve had a lot of full-padded practices, and we’ve been working pretty hard. We had a walk through today, and we’ll be back to hitting this afternoon.

On Tank Williams and how he’s looked…
Good at times, and at other times, he has to learn things. He’s never done it before. He’s never done it before, so he’s learning. I think it’s different for him, taking on guards, sometimes, at that type of level. He’s used to second-level sort of situations where he has more space. But surprisingly, he’s accepted it all and he’s done a good job with it, doing the best he can out there — he’s still with the first group, working hard. I think it’s different for me, seeing him in there, a twenty number in there and smaller body, but he’s getting the job done.

How about Jerod?
He’s coming. I think the biggest things is just his attitude. He’s willing to learn. He’s willing to learn and he’s asking questions and he’s … you can see the ability he has out here. He’s running and hitting and he’s physical at times. I think what I’m most impressed about is his attitude and willingness to accept the system.

On the linebackers helping out new faces in the secondary…
I can’t turn around in the middle of a play and tell them what to do. That’s their area back there. They’re going to have to get the job done themselves. I think they have been so far. I mean, we haven’t played any games yet, but I think the learning curve is something they’ve accepted, and they know it’s difficult. But Wilhite, Wheatley … Brandon Meriweather has taken a more vocal role this year. You can hear him communicating out there. I think he’s done a great job.

On the most important thing for him through the first few days of camp…
I think just the physical aspect for me, being an inside linebacker. Getting back in the running game and putting your face back there, putting your face in the middle of Logan Mankins and some of the offensive linemen that we have — you have to get used to hitting people again. In the front seven, I think that’s the biggest thing we have to get used to again. Your body has the soreness after the first and second day, where you realize … your body is sort of asking you, ‘What are you doing to me?’ After practices four, five and six, it sort of remembers. And you hope your body remembers to the point where you just get back in football shape and start hitting each other again.

Tedy Bruschi Q&A, 7/29 : Chris Price - New England Patriots Blog


Tedy Bruschi chooses wisely
Retirement should be real
By Tony Massarotti | Wednesday, July 30, 2008 | http://www.bostonherald.com | N.E. Patriots



FOXBORO - Tedy Bruschi [stats] is 35 years old and a veteran of 12 NFL seasons. As much as any athlete who has worn a uniform at the professional level, Bruschi knows that life goes on.

With or without you.

What does this have to do with the Patriots [team stats]? Along with the rest of his teammates, Bruschi was at Gillette Stadium yesterday as the Pats continued training camp workouts and preparations for 2008. At the end of last season, Bruschi went through the annual process of reflecting on the year’s events and decided to return to football, agreeing to a multiyear contract.

Like Brett Favre, Bruschi might have retired.

He chose not to.

“I would take that responsibility as a player,” Bruschi said. “As a player, the decisions you make, you have to realize the ramifications of them. When you say you’re going to hang it up, that’s got to be your (final) decision. If anything, I’m learning from this. Certainly, when my time comes, I’m going to take my time.”

All of this brings us back to Favre, whose current tug of war with the Green Bay Packers has taken on ridiculous proportions. (Pats running back Kevin Faulk [stats] suggested the Favre saga was “like a soap opera.”) The objectives of a team and its star player are now running counter to one another yet again, and Favre seems to take on a greater resemblance to Cal Ripken Jr. with each passing day.

Should he stay or should he go?

And when you get right down to it, is there really a difference between Manny being Manny and Brett being Brett?

One thing about football: The players hold themselves accountable like no other athletes. The game requires unique sacrifice and cooperation, which is the principle on which Pats coach Bill Belichick’s operation is built. Do your part. Selfishness and individuality can undermine the team’s goals, and everyone is asked to work within the framework.

Three years ago, when Ellis Hobbs [stats] first joined the Patriots, the young and aggressive cornerback foolishly went for an interception during a preseason game and allowed a big gain. After the game, Belichick uncharacteristically spoke of how gambles of the like render useless the efforts of the other 10 players on the field.

Get the message?

In Bruschi’s case, he already has given 12 years of service to the Patriots and had his career threatened by a stroke in 2005. His career seemed over. Any similarity to Favre’s situation pretty much ends there, primarily because Bruschi nearly had his career taken away from him while Favre volunteered to give it up.

At least temporarily.

“I was flip-flopping a lot,” Bruschi said when asked about his decision to return to football. “I think I was in a different place in my life than Favre is now.”

On the surface, one might have guessed that a veteran like Bruschi would have sided with Favre in a dispute like the one taking place between the former(?) Green Bay quarterback and the Packers franchise. Players stick together, right? Yet Bruschi has played his entire career for a franchise that puts the group above all else, in a sport where selflessness is mandatory, where players cannot flip-flop like politicians to whatever strikes their fancy.

Where Favre had doubts, Bruschi did not.

“It didn’t take me long to realize I still had the hunger and that I wanted to play,” Bruschi said. “I really didn’t have that moment in my life where I doubted the passion. The fire to play is still there with me.

“I think I’m very far from (retirement).”

And whenever he gets close, he will think before he acts.
 

Tedy Bruschi chooses wisely - BostonHerald.com

 

Bruschi likes what he sees; Tuesday walkthrough notes By Andy Hart, Patriots Football Weekly

Tedy Bruschi and the Patriots took part in a light walkthrough Tuesday morning at Gillette Stadium, the first of the day’s two practice sessions.



Tedy Bruschi has pretty much seen it all in his 13 seasons in Foxborough. He’s been the rookie. He’s been the guy switching positions. He’s been hurt. He’s been healthy. He’s been a winner. And he’s been a loser.

With that sort of experience comes a certain degree credibility when it comes to giving fans an early, insider look at what’s going on in the first week of training camp. The team’s leading tackler from a year ago and the man controlling the middle of the Pats defense took a few minutes following Tuesday morning’s training camp walkthrough to comment on some of the more interesting storylines taking hold this summer at Gillette.

Hitting closest to home is the battle for the job next to Bruschi at inside linebacker in New England’s 3-4 front. So far in camp that spot has been held by first-year Patriot Tank Williams, a guy who spent his previous six NFL seasons playing safety. How does the former Pro Bowler think his current playing partner has looked through his first few days of camp at a new position?

“Good at times and other times he has to learn things,” Bruschi said. “He’s never done it before. So he’s learning. I think it’s different for him taking on guards sometimes at that type level. He’s used to second level sort of situations where he has a little bit more space. Surprisingly, he’s accepted it all and he’s done a good job of it doing the best he can out there. He’s still with the first group working hard and I think it’s different for seeing him in there, a 20 number there, and a smaller body. But he’s getting the job done.”

Another candidate battling for playing time at inside linebacker is first-round pick Jerod Mayo. The physically gifted. No. 10 overall selection has spent camp working alongside free agent addition Victor Hobson with the second unit, trying to learn the complexities of Bill Belichick’s defensive scheme.

“He’s coming. I think the biggest thing is just his attitude,” Bruschi said, clearly impressed by his young understudy. “He’s willing to learn. He’s willing to learn and he’s asking questions and you can see the ability he has out here. He’s running and hitting and physical at times. I think what I’m most impressed about is just his attitude and just his willingness to accept this system.”

While Bruschi is witnessing the competition first hand at linebacker, the intense battles at other spots aren’t exactly his first concern at this point in camp. Like linebacker, there are starting jobs to be won at cornerback where veterans and rookies are going head to head in an effort to win roles with the defending AFC champs.

As experienced at Bruschi is, and as much as he might be able to help out the new faces at linebacker, the defensive captain knows he can’t be too worried about what’s going on behind him on the football field.

“I can’t turn around in the middle of the play tell them what to do. That’s their area back there,” Bruschi said. “So they are going to have to get the job done themselves. I think they have been so far. We haven’t played any games yet. But I think the learning curve is something they have accepted and they know it’s difficult. [Jonathan] Wilhite, Terrence Wheatley -- Brandon Meriweather has taken a more vocal role this year. He’s communicating out there.”

And in the end Bruschi has really only one person to worry about at this point – himself. While some jobs are more obviously up for grabs than others, training camp is about competition for all with an eye on overall team improvement. That, combined with an abundance of full pads practice action at the direction of Belichick, has led to solid intensity for the first six days of camp.

“It’s good,” Bruschi said, comparing the 2008 training camp intensity to previous years.
“I think training camp intensity is always high. Especially when your head coach put you in full pads, because I think everyone realizes out there, even myself, that still there are jobs to win. There are jobs to be captured out there. I think everyone from starter all the way to practice squad player last year has to realize that.”

Bruschi likes what he sees; Tuesday walkthrough notes

 Bruschi trying to mold Patriots rookies

07:33 AM EDT on Friday, August 1, 2008

By KEVIN McNAMARA
Journal Sports Writer

FOXBORO — Whoever lines up next to inside linebacker Tedy Bruschi in the middle of the New England Patriots’ defense carries an lot of responsibility on his shoulder pads.

First comes the task of helping to anchor one of the NFL’s best units. Keeping Bill Belichick content is a major challenge, too.

While Bruschi doesn’t have to worry about fellow vets Mike Vrabel and Adalius Thomas, he is spending a lot of time with a trio of fresh-faced linebackers. He wants to make sure first-round pick Jerod Mayo, third-rounder Shawn Crable or undrafted free agent Gary Guyton are all prepared to guard his back when the regular season rolls around.

“I just look at them and are they able to learn? How’s their attitude?” Bruschi said after practice yesterday. “They’ve had a great attitude this entire camp. They’ve been willing to do everything we ask of them because we don’t ask rookies to do just one thing. We ask them to do A, B, C and D. We want them to do all those things well.”

Injecting some youth and speed into the heart of his defense was clearly one of Belichick’s chief off-season priorities. While the coach is widely considered a defensive guru, he asks veterans such as Bruschi, Vrabel and Thomas to help groom their replacements. That can be a prickly proposition, but the current Patriot vets embrace the responsibility in their own style.

“We sort of pressure other players to work as hard as we do,” Bruschi said. “We ask them if they did as much as we did today. It’s sort of a little game. This is what we did, what did you do? This is what time we came in, how about you? We challenge the younger guys to make them see that the work doesn’t stop when you get to training camp; it just starts.”

Mayo clearly welcomes the attention. He remarked that “the complexity of the defense is different. You could have 10 or 11 checks on one play. Recognizing formations and all the shifts that go on, it’s pretty difficult.”

“(Bruschi) talked to us today about mental toughness and just taking it one play at a time,” said Mayo. “He’s definitely helped me a lot. Watching film, he tells me things and just recognizes things before they happen.”

Mayo, the 10th pick in the draft out of Tennessee, said he wasn’t sure what to expect from Super Bowl-winning stars like Bruschi, Vrabel and Rodney Harrison. What he’s seen has excited him about the team’s future.

“Bruschi’s a great guy. He’s shown me a lot of love since the first day I got here,” said Mayo. “I really wasn’t expecting that from an older guy like him but he’s really proven me wrong. I couldn’t ask to be in a better situation. Bruschi’s an all-pro guy, an all-pro man off the field. I would like to model myself after Tedy Bruschi.”

But don’t get the idea that the veterans are taking it easy on the rookies. At the start of yesterday’s morning practice, all of the rookies participated in a fumble drill where players careened over a man-made pond that drenched their pads. In case someone wasn’t wet enough, Bruschi stood by with a hose and fired away. Other vets have led the newcomers through different rookie hazing rituals.

“I just try to show them what the right thing to do is and what the wrong thing to do is,” Bruschi said. “From accepting coaching, understanding that everybody had to dive through that puddle and sing songs and carry someone’s pads. I was carrying Chris Slade’s pads 13 years ago. So here you go; carry mine.”

Mayo said he’s had to sing to his new teammates (he chose the Gospel song “This Little Light of Mine”) and doesn’t mind carrying a set of sweaty pads. After all, he knows that the good things the veterans are sending his way are irreplaceable.

http://www.projo.com/patriots/content/sp_fbn_new_england_patriots01_08-01-08_N7B2I4_v10.3f5fcde.html

Scout.com > New England
Bruschi Sees Talent In The New Faces
Scout.com
PatriotsInsider.com Aug 5, 2008


Sometimes even the best known players on the Patriots get asked about everyone else in camp. Tedy Bruschi can't be worried about what everyone else is doing, but he realizes there are a lot of new faces in Foxboro.

Tedy Bruschi has pretty much seen it all in his 13 seasons in New England. He's been the rookie. He's been the guy switching positions. He's been hurt. He's been healthy. He's been a winner. And he's been a loser.

With that sort of experience comes a certain degree of credibility when it comes to giving fans an early, insider look at what's going on in the first week of training camp. The team's leading tackler from a year ago and the man controlling the middle of the Pats defense brings a unique perspective to comments on some of the more interesting storylines taking hold this summer at Gillette Stadium.

Hitting closest to home is the battle for the job next to Bruschi at inside linebacker in New England's 3-4 front. So far in camp that spot has been held by first-year Patriot Tank Williams, a guy who spent his previous six NFL seasons playing safety. How does the former Pro Bowler think his current playing partner has looked through his first few days of camp at a new position?

"Good at times and other times he has to learn things," Bruschi said. "He's never done it before. So he's learning. I think it's different for him taking on guards sometimes at that type level. He's used to second level sort of situations where he has a little bit more space. Surprisingly, he's accepted it all and he's done a good job of it doing the best he can out there. He's still with the first group working hard and I think it's different for seeing him in there, a 20 number there, and a smaller body. But he's getting the job done."

Another candidate battling for playing time at inside linebacker is first-round pick Jerod Mayo. The physically gifted No. 10 overall selection has spent camp working alongside free agent addition Victor Hobson with the second unit, trying to learn the complexities of Bill Belichick's defensive scheme.

"He's coming. I think the biggest thing is just his attitude," Bruschi said, clearly impressed by his young understudy. "He's willing to learn. He's willing to learn and he's asking questions and you can see the ability he has out here. He's running and hitting and physical at times. I think what I'm most impressed about is just his attitude and just his willingness to accept this system."

While Bruschi is witnessing the competition first hand at linebacker, the intense battles at other spots aren't exactly his first concern at this point in camp. Like linebacker, there are starting jobs to be won at cornerback where veterans and rookies are going head to head in an effort to win roles with the defending AFC champs.

As experienced as Bruschi is, and as much as he might be able to help out the new faces at linebacker, the defensive captain knows he can't be too worried about what's going on behind him on the football field.

"I can't turn around in the middle of the play tell them what to do. That's their area back there," Bruschi said. "So they are going to have to get the job done themselves. I think they have been so far. We haven't played any games yet. But I think the learning curve is something they have accepted and they know it's difficult. (Jonathan) Wilhite, Terrence Wheatley -- Brandon Meriweather has taken a more vocal role this year. He's communicating out there."

And in the end, Bruschi has really only one person to worry about at this point -- himself. While some jobs are more obviously up for grabs than others, training camp is about competition for all with an eye on overall team improvement. That, combined with an abundance of full pads practice action at the direction of Belichick, has led to solid intensity for the first six days of camp.

"It's good," Bruschi said, comparing the 2008 training camp intensity to previous years. "I think training camp intensity is always high. Especially when your head coach puts you in full pads, because I think everyone realizes out there, even myself, that still there are jobs to win. There are jobs to be captured out there. I think everyone from starter all the way to practice squad player last year has to realize that."

Scout.com: Bruschi Sees Talent In The New Faces

 


Bruschi, other vets guide rookie Patriots
By KEVIN MCNAMARA, The Providence Journal


FOXBORO, Mass. – Whoever lines up next to inside linebacker Tedy Bruschi in the middle of the New England Patriots' defense carries a lot of responsibility on his shoulder pads.

First comes the task of helping to anchor one of the NFL's best units. Keeping Bill Belichick content is a major challenge, too.

While Bruschi doesn't have to worry about fellow vets Mike Vrabel and Adalius Thomas, he is spending a lot of time with a trio of fresh-faced linebackers. He wants to make sure first-round pick Jerod Mayo, third-rounder Shawn Crable or undrafted free agent Gary Guyton are all prepared to guard his back when the regular season rolls around.

"I just look at them and are they able to learn? How's their attitude?" Bruschi said after practice last week. "They've had a great attitude this entire camp. They've been willing to do everything we ask of them because we don't ask rookies to do just one thing. We ask them to do A, B, C and D. We want them to do all those things well."

Injecting some youth and speed into the heart of his defense was clearly one of Belichick's chief off-season priorities. While the coach is widely considered a defensive guru, he asks veterans such as Bruschi, Vrabel and Thomas to help groom their replacements. That can be a prickly proposition, but the current Patriot vets embrace the responsibility in their own style.

"We sort of pressure other players to work as hard as we do," Bruschi said. "We ask them if they did as much as we did to day. It's sort of a little game. This is what we did, what did you do? This is what time we came in, how about you? We challenge the younger guys to make them see that the work doesn't stop when you get to training camp; it just starts."

Mayo clearly welcomes the attention. He remarked that "the complexity of the defense is different. You could have 10 or 11 checks on one play. Recognizing formations and all the shifts that go on, it's pretty difficult."

"(Bruschi) talked to us today about mental toughness and just taking it one play at a time," said Mayo. "He's definitely helped me a lot. Watching film, he tells me things and just recognizes things before they happen."

Mayo, the 10th pick in the draft out of Tennessee, said he wasn't sure what to expect from Super Bowl-winning stars like Bruschi, Vrabel and Rodney Harrison. What he's seen has excited him about the team's future.

"Bruschi's a great guy. He's shown me a lot of love since the first day I got here," said Mayo. "I really wasn't expecting that from an older guy like him but he's really proven me wrong. I couldn't ask to be in a better situation. Bruschi's an all-pro guy, an all-pro man off the field. I would like to model myself after Tedy Bruschi."

But don't get the idea that the veterans are taking it easy on the rookies. At the start of yesterday's morning practice, all of the rookies participated in a fumble drill where players careened over a man-made pond that drenched their pads. In case someone wasn't wet enough, Bruschi stood by with a hose and fired away. Other vets have led the newcomers through different rookie hazing rituals.

"I just try to show them what the right thing to do is and what the wrong thing to do is," Bruschi said. "From accepting coaching, understanding that everybody had to dive through that puddle and sing songs and carry someone's pads. I was carrying Chris Slade's pads 13 years ago. So here you go; carry mine."

Mayo said he's had to sing to his new teammates (he chose the Gospel song "This Little Light of Mine") and doesn't mind carrying a set of sweaty pads. After all, he knows that the good things the veterans are sending his way are irreplaceable.

E-mail Kevin McNamara at kmcnamar@projo.com. Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service, www.scrippsnews.com.

© 2007, Telegraph Publishing Company, Nashua, New Hampshire

http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080804/SPORTS09/438965613



PATRIOTS NOTEBOOK
Defense knows it must start stopping foes early
By Christopher L. Gasper, Globe Staff | September 7, 2008


FOXBOROUGH - The Patriots are hoping for a fresh start stopping opposing offenses today when they open the regular season against the Kansas City Chiefs at Gillette Stadium.

During its 0-4 preseason, New England's first-team defense allowed the opposition to score on its opening drive all four times - two touchdowns and two field goals. Although it is easy to chalk that up to preseason play, linebacker Tedy Bruschi said you can't just throw out the defense's slow starts.

"Absolutely not, I see it as a problem," said Bruschi. "It's really bottom-line for defenses: Did they score or didn't they score? Teams have been able to score on us, especially on the first drive, and that's something that we're trying to preach with each other amongst the locker room and the team, is start fast, get out there, start doing your job right now. Let's get off the field and give our offense advantageous field position."

Bruschi said the solution is simple.
"Right now, how you get off the field is just to play better because it's about stopping those run plays, stopping those pass plays," said Bruschi.

Despite the fact that the Patriots held opponents to 3.7 yards per rush during the preseason, Baltimore, Tampa Bay, Philadelphia, and the Giants combined to run the ball 21 times for 111 yards on opening drives.

With a healthy Larry Johnson and a capable stable of backups, the Chiefs are likely to try to come out running and create play-action opportunities for third-year quarterback Brodie Croyle, who is 0-6 as a starter.

"We have to tackle better," said safety Rodney Harrison. "We have to hustle to the ball more. We had glimpses of six, seven guys tackling [the ball carrier] against the Giants and other preseason games, and other times we would have one-on-one battles. In the past, this defense has had success by having five or six guys always on the ball carrier, and that's what we have to get back to. We will. That's a point of emphasis."

Work but no play
While the Patriots start their season today, right guard Stephen Neal won't be starting his. Neal, who sat out all of training camp, opens the season on the physically unable to perform list and is not eligible to practice or play until after the sixth week of the regular season.

"I guess you feel a little detached," said Neal, who is coming back from a knee injury he sustained in Super Bowl XLII. "Going out there suiting up with the guys on Sunday, that's always a big thing. But you can only do what you can do. I can come here, and I can work hard to get back out there on the field and that's what I'm going to try to do."

Neal has a workout buddy in offensive lineman Oliver Ross, who is opening the season on the non-football-injury list. The two will work together and take mental reps to get up to speed until they can return. Neal said he anticipates being able to play this season.

Returns Dept.
One area where new Patriots cornerback Deltha O'Neal could make an impact is punt returns, especially with wide receiver Wes Welker, the regular punt returner, having suffered a rib injury returning a punt against the Eagles. O'Neal has spent extra time with special teams coach Brad Seely, something all new players involved in the kicking game do. Patriots coach Bill Belichick said there's more to punt returning than meets the eye. "Certainly, catching it and running aggressively with the ball, that is what the job is," said Belichick. "There are a lot of coaching points that go into the return game, the rush game, plus-50 punting and, in our stadium, the wind is always a factor. There are always things like that that play a factor. There are some strategy situations, scheme and situational plays involved." . . . The Patriots enter today's game with an NFL-record 19-game regular-season winning steak that dates to Dec. 17, 2006 . . . The Patriots are 6-0 in home openers at Gillette Stadium. They have won four straight season openers and are 24-24 all-time on opening day.

Defense knows it must start stopping foes early - The Boston Globe


News and Notes:

Another vote that it wasn't a dirty hit
According to the Boston Globe, Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi said on a Boston radio station today that he didn't think Bernard Pollard tried to injure Tom Brady.

"(As a defensive player) I fight and fight and fight. To make pressure, to alter a throw, and The hit in my mind that was what he was doing," Bruschi said. "Did he intentionally want to hurt Tom there? I don't think so."


Another vote that it wasn't a dirty hit | Over the Top


 

Patriots’ defense focuses on shutting down opponents instead of dwelling on Tom Brady’s injury

01:00 AM EDT on Saturday, September 13, 2008

BY ROBERT LEE

Journal Sports Writer



FOXBORO — It seems as if everyone is concerned about the Patriots’ offense without Tom Brady running the show.

Everyone but the Patriots, that is.

New England defensive coordinator Dean Pees isn’t worried.

“There is only one group that can control the outcome of this game and that is the defense,” Pees said. “If they don’t score, then we either win or tie. We have the bottom line in this thing.”

That, he said, is the message that he has been giving to his players since he first began coaching, 36 years ago.

“Our job on defense is to stop the other team from scoring,” Pees said.

Pees isn’t worried about the Patriots’ offense, because the Patriots’ defense, he said, has the ability to control the outcome of the game.

“It doesn’t matter if [our offense] puts up 50 or they put up six, it’s our job to keep [the opposing team] shut down and to keep the score down as low as we could possibly keep it. We try to keep them to zero if that’s humanly possible.”

Many of the Patriots defensive players are echoing his statements.

“When you’re told something like that by your coach, whether it be your head coach, defensive coordinator, or positional coach, you’re going to take it to heart and really try to correlate that to when you play on the field on Sunday,” Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi said.

So what is the key to containing the Jets’ offense, led by future Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre?

“It’s just a matter of us going out there and executing our game plan, making tackles, making plays on the ball, and not giving up big plays,” Patriots safety Rodney Harrison said.

“We definitely have to win on first-downs so that we can get in situations where they can’t get back on track, and [keep them] in third-and-long type of situations,” defensive lineman Richard Seymour said. “…I think first down is always a big down and then third down to get off of the field…I think if we take advantage and do all of the things as far as stopping the run, no big plays in the passing game, and create turnovers, any team can be successful [if they do] that.”

Last Sunday against Kansas City, Pees said that he was pleased that the Patriots’ defense won the majority of first-down plays, meaning that they consistently had Kansas City on second-and-7 or longer.

The Pats hope to do that again tomorrow against the Jets.

The Patriots allowed the Chiefs to convert on 8-of-16 third-downs, which Pees was upset about. The Patriots had the fourth-best third-down defense last season, allowing teams to convert on third down only 34 percent of the time.

“Last year, we did a fairly decent job on third down and we want to continue that,” Pees said. “Last week there were a couple of situations where we were very competitive on the routes but the guy still made the catch, basically [Tony] Gonzalez. Regardless of that, we have to do a better job on third down. When we went back and studied it, I always do a win-loss column on how we do on first, second and third down.

“It was probably the best we have done on first down in a long time. Our win percentage was very, very high. That is what you want. You want to get them to third down and get them off the field. We just have to do a little better job of playing our techniques and doing some things to get off the field. We have to get that number (third-down success rate) lower.”

Pees said that the Patriots’ secondary must be patient to have success against Favre because Favre holds on to the ball a little longer than some other quarterbacks, which gives his wide receivers more time to get open.

“It’s always a challenge when any team can throw the ball vertically down the field,” Pees said. “You have to defend it and you don’t want to give up the big play. Anytime you are doing that, then there is more of a chance they are throwing the ball underneath. [Favre] has always been a challenge and always will be a challenge just because of that. The other reason that makes him a challenge is that he can make plays when things break down.”

His defensive backs are taking his words to heart.

“We have to be patient,” Harrison said. “We can’t get frustrated. They’re going to make their plays. They get paid to. But at the same time there are certain things that we can control and we can control the way we tackle, the way we can try to control to stop the run, as well as not giving up big plays.”

With the talk about Favre, people are forgetting about the Jets’ running game, Seymour said. The Jets ran the ball for 112 yards last week against Miami.

“I still think they are going to come in and establish the run but Favre does have a huge arm and he can make plays out of broken plays,” Seymour said.

“He always ad libs and I think he is the master at taking a play that doesn’t look like much or scrambling around and finding a guy wide open down field so I think our defensive backs have to do a good job of covering their guys for a few extra seconds and defensively that may give us a chance to get down on the quarterback and make a few plays. We’ll see how it turns out.”
 

http://www.projo.com/patriots/content/sp_fbn_patriots13_09-13-08_R7BISDA_v14.17c1f64.html



Reunion time for Bruschi, ex-coach
By Christopher L. Gasper, Globe Staff | October 10, 2008


SAN JOSE, Calif. - In his office, San Jose State football coach Dick Tomey still has a 1994 Sports Illustrated college football preview issue with Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi and four of his University of Arizona teammates on the cover. Bruschi's hair is longer, his face more youthful, and his number a foreign 68, instead of the famed 54, but the fiery eyes remain the same.

Tomey knew Bruschi before he was a New England sports icon and smiling pitchman, back when he was just a hard-working kid from Roseville, Calif., outside Sacramento, who wanted to play college football. Tomey and his staff at Arizona were one of the few big-time schools that came after Bruschi, who even back then was being told he was too small or too slow.

That was the same refrain Bruschi heard from NFL talent evaluators when he left Arizona following the 1995 season as the NCAA's all-time sack leader. Thirteen seasons later, Bruschi is still playing in the NFL, preparing this week for the 181st game of his career, a career that in part he owes to Tomey.

Football fate brought Tomey and Bruschi back together this week with the Patriots practicing at San Jose State in preparation for Sunday night's game against the San Diego Chargers, the second leg of their back-to-back West Coast road games.

"It brings back fond memories for me," said Bruschi. "An old teammate of mine, Joe Salave'a, is on his coaching staff. I feel like I sort of relate to this program because I've been keeping up with it also. I'm from the University of Arizona, but Coach Tomey is my coach.

"He's the one that helped me develop in my college years and take me from an 18-year-old freshman to a 23-year-old fifth-year senior, so I attribute a lot of my success to what Coach Tomey taught me, and I see he's doing great things with the program here."

It's not exactly an accident that Bruschi is at San Jose State. When the school was approached by the Patriots about using its facilities, Tomey gave his approval knowing it would bring Bruschi to campus.

"That was an ulterior motive," said Tomey, who is in his fourth season at San Jose State. "To me, that was important. Just to see him. I don't get to see him. We're both going a thousand miles an hour, and getting a chance to spend time with him is something I was looking forward to."

The two went out to dinner last night, and Bruschi will speak to the Spartans today following the Patriots' practice. Bruschi of all people should know what an honor that is, because the detail-oriented Tomey doesn't let just anyone address his team, especially the day before a big game. San Jose State plays its homecoming game tomorrow against Utah State.

"I don't do that a lot because I don't trust people," said Tomey, who has infused energy, enthusiasm, and expectations into the San Jose State program since taking over a 2-9 team in 2005. "I don't trust most people that they would say the right thing, no matter whether they're some football coach or politician or president or whoever. Some coaches have every Tom, Dick, and Harry talk to their team. I don't because I want to know that whoever it is is going to represent reality in the best way to the players, and I know [Bruschi] will."

"I'm looking forward to it because although it's a different university and they're wearing a different logo on the side of their helmets, I feel like we're being brought up the same by Coach Tomey," said Bruschi. "I know there are certain things that are important to him that are still important to me now that he's teaching them, so I do feel a connection to this program."

A lot has changed since Tomey brought Bruschi to Arizona in 1991. Bruschi is a 35-year-old NFL veteran with a wife and three kids now. He's no longer the carefree kid on the red scooter in the Sports Illustrated article.

At Arizona, he was a defensive end and the leader of the "Desert Swarm" defense. In the NFL, he's one of the most instinctive linebackers of his generation and one of the most inspirational, returning from a stroke in 2005 to resume his career.

Tomey always believed Bruschi would be a success in the NFL. He just needed somebody to do what he'd done with the kid from Roseville - ignore the measurements and turn on the tape.

"I think he's the kind of person that could do just about anything that his capabilities would allow him to do," said Tomey. "He was a great defensive end. Obviously, he would be undersized for the NFL, although [Dwight] Freeney and those guys are about his size, but he was just tremendously quick and he had a tremendous passion. He played at a different level than most other players, but again, he came that way and that's not something we taught him.

"When he was coming out of college, everybody was suspicious about 'is he big enough? Can he run fast enough?' And you're trying to pound it into their heads: 'You just need to watch the tape. He's a special player.' Gladly, the Patriots recognized that."

Christopher L. Gasper can be reached at cgasper@globe.com.



© Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company


Patriot Bruschi has reunion with college coach - The Boston Globe


These kids are all right
Bruschi: Young LBs are impressive


If the Patriots are forced to go without outside linebacker Adalius Thomas the rest of the way because of a broken arm, more responsibility will fall on New England’s younger linebackers.

On the inside, rookies Jerod Mayo has been a rock next to Tedy Bruschi through the first nine games of the season, while fellow rookie Gary Guyton has seen more and more time over the last few weeks, usually spelling Bruschi in third down and other passing situations. And third-year linebacker Pierre Woods took over at outside linebacker after Thomas went down with an arm injury early in Sunday’s 20-10 win over the Bills.

But if the Patriots are unable to pick someone off the street to fill the spot — veteran outside linebacker Rosevelt Colvin is out there — the kids will likely be asked to pick up more of the slack in Thomas’ absence, particularly Woods on the outside. The Michigan product sounded yesterday like he was up to the challenge.

“I’ve learned a lot from Adalius [Thomas], Mike [Vrabel], Rosevelt [Colvin], Junior [Seau], all of those guys,” Woods told reporters. “Like I said, I’m a like a sponge; I continue to soak up knowledge.”

Thomas reportedly suffered the injury to his right arm in the first half of Sunday’s win. “It’s not good,” a source told ESPN.com. “He’s probably done (for the season).” If he is lost for the remainder of 2008, it would be the latest in a long line of New England starters who has been sidelined for the year because of injury, a list of players that includes quarterback Tom Brady, running back Laurence Maroney and safety Rodney Harrison.

“We talk about this all the time,” Vrabel told reporters. “It is just our focus with three days has to be on the [New York] Jets. We are going to have 11 guys out there. It is unfortunate that [Adalius Thomas] is not going to be there this week, but we have three days to concentrate on the Jets.”

“We can't do anything about it. It is a tough loss," said defensive lineman Jarvis Green. “Losing Adalius, he’s a key to this defense but we have to move on and get ready for the Jets.”

Going forward, those young linebackers have the endorsement of Bruschi, who has been impressed with the way they’ve picked up the pro game.

“They are willing to learn, and that always makes me happy, when I see young players willing to learn and accept coaching and accept suggestions from the other players,” Bruschi said. “They’ve gone out there and they’ve made plays for us.

“I like playing with them. I like having fun with them. What makes it more enjoyable for me is that they’re getting the job done when they’re out there, too. Now that we have minicamps and offseason workouts and training camps and half a season together, I really don’t see them as rookies anymore. We really expect a lot out of them.”

While Bruschi backs all of them, he’s developed a particular closeness with Mayo. The two have started together at inside linebacker throughout the season, and Mayo’s performance has dispelled the long-held myth that young linebackers frequently struggle with Bill Belichick’s schemes.

“He’s a smart kid. There are times where I can bounce a question off him,” Bruschi said of Mayo, New England’s first-round pick last spring. “It’s just that usual talk you have with someone you’ve played with for a little while.”

Metro - These kids are all right
 



Patriots defense becoming dominant


FOXBORO - Don't look now, but the Patriots are starting to play with a level of dynastic confidence on both sides of the ball.

Their steady improvement on offense has been easy to see. But overlooked in the euphoria over the evolution of Matt Cassel as their quarterback has been a steady improvement in their defense, despite enduring almost as many injuries as has haunted the offense since Tom Brady went down in the first game of the season.

In Sunday's 20-10 victory over the Buffalo Bills, the Patriots' defenders had the same answer when asked what carried the day in a statistically dominating performance.

"We just played very physical with them," safety James Sanders said. "We know that they're a timing-passing team, so to go out there and just be physical, and to throw off their rhythm and timing was the key."

The Patriots held a dangerous Bills' rushing attack to just 60 yards on 18 carries. Nor could the passing attack get untracked, as Trent Edwards completed 13 of 23 passes for just 120 yards, with one touchdown and two interceptions. He was dropped twice for 12 yards in losses. "That's what we talk about, to stop the run and prevent big plays," veteran linebacker Tedy Bruschi said. "I think we did a good job of that today. (Marshawn) Lynch runs hard. He's a great young runner that's got a great future ahead of him, he's one of those players that after you play him, you really respect him.

"I think you saw him dragging us a few times," Bruschi added. "We had to go in at halftime and say to ourselves, 'this guy's running hard, let's rally to that ball and wrap those legs up.'"

Lynch finished with 46 yards on 14 carries, with just 20 of those yards coming in the second half.

"Both of those guys can run the football, and I think that they got a lot of our attention this week," linebacker Mike Vrabel said, including tailback Fred Jackson in the mix. "Certainly, with their running game, there's no quicker way to kill you than with Lynch or Jackson. So we were focused on them, and I think it showed."

Ellis Hobbs and Deltha O'Neil turned in interceptions, which also made a big difference in keeping the Bills from sustaining any offensive momentum.

"To see Deltha get a pick like that, to see our defense finish their rushes and getting quarterback sacks like that, those are things that, as a defense you want to do," said Bruschi, alluding to sacks by Richard Seymour and Ty Warren. "You want to get the turnovers, and you don't want to just get pressure on the quarterback, you want to get him to the ground. It was nice to accomplish those two goals."

Bruschi refused to assume that the Patriots' experience in big games (including 10 straight wins over the Bills) was a telling factor because, with players like Rodney Harrison out of the mix and younger players making bigger contributions, the Patriots' defense has a different makeup.

"We're sort of a different team now and we've got younger guys that haven't been in those situations before," he said, "so we just need to take it as we go, take it one game at a time and prepare the best we can."

There was only one bad lapse, and it was more the fault of special teams when Leodis McKelvin broke an 85-yard kickoff return near the end of the game and it eventually led to Buffalo's only touchdown.

"What's a little frustrating is that I think we fell asleep a little bit at the end," Vrabel said. "We had a lot of defensive guys covering that kick, and then we gave up that touchdown ... a little unfortunate to finish the game out like that, and I hope it doesn't cost us down the road."

WEB EXTRA: Pats defense becoming dominant - The Sun Chronicle Online - Sports

Quick Hits: Tedy Bruschi, Shawn Crable, Deion Branch...

By John Tomase | Sunday, December 14, 2008 | http://www.bostonherald.com | NFL Coverage

Photo by Nancy Lane
* Putting Tedy Bruschi  on injured reserve is not a good move for the Patriots.

The Herald reported last week the Pats were considering that move because their veteran inside linebacker won’t return to action for three weeks to a month, which would cover the rest of the regular season, and the Pats are desperate for linebackers in order to make a playoff push.

The reward hardly seems worth the cost. Whatever linebackers are left on the market at this point ranked behind Rosevelt Colvin and Junior Seau in the Pats’ eyes. Whoever they sign could hardly be counted on to make much of a contribution.

The Pats are better off sticking Vince Redd out there, gambling that they can somehow scrape into the playoffs, and then welcoming Bruschi back in the postseason should they make it that far.

Even if Bruschi has lost a step, the Pats are better off with what he could provide in January than the limited production they’re sure to receive from his replacement.

* Speaking of Bruschi and all of the injuries at linebacker, it’s fair to wonder if the Pats regret placing rookie outside linebacker Shawn Crable on injured reserve at the start of November with a bad shin.

Had they known they were going to lose half their linebacking corps, they might have given Crable more time to heal as insurance.

Then again, he never played a snap on gameday, so maybe he wasn’t going to be ready to contribute this year regardless of his health.

* There’s a good chance the Seahawks won’t pick up Deion Branch’s $4.94 million option next year.

Could he end up back with the Pats? Nothing’s impossible.

Branch would be the perfect complement to Wes Welker and Randy Moss, as well as an upgrade over current No. 3 receiver Jabar Gaffney [stats]. He could step onto the field and immediately have as good a rapport with Tom Brady as anyone on the roster, and he might even come cheaply after a pair of injury-ravaged seasons.

It’s funny how football works. Branch left on what appeared to be impossibly bad terms in 2006, but there’s no reason he couldn’t come back.

* What a strange run for Adam “Pacman” Jones in Dallas. The player who wants to be called Adam but often acts like Pacman will miss today’s game not because of a bar fight or disturbing the peace charge, but due to a neck injury that some believe could be career-threatening.

If that turns out to be the case, it’s scary to think how he’ll spend his time without football to keep him on the straight and narrow.

* Since the NFL is hell bent on directing every fan seeking highlights to its official Web site, here are a couple of suggestions.

One, how about increasing the resolution so videos can be watched full screen without looking like some grainy Sasquatch footage on YouTube? The NFL is broadcasting games in 3-D and HD. With the proliferation of broadband connections, fans should be given the choice of watching higher quality highlights.

Second, how about opening up the NFL Films vaults for clips of players from yesteryear? High school freshman Barry Sanders Jr. made jaws drop last week with a breathtaking touchdown run in the Oklahoma state playoffs.

The run prompted a couple of blogs to link to practically unwatchable Barry Sanders Sr. highlights, which would have been amazing if they weren’t pixelated into oblivion.

The NFL’s got access to the greatest Barry Sanders highlight reel in the world. How about making it available to the Web-viewing public?

* Speaking of NFL Web sites, here’s a pet peeve about the Patriots’ official site: Why does the URL Patriots.com lead to a page that says, Jump to the Patriots.com homepage?

Isn’t that where Patriots.com should take you?

That’s an extra click. I’m lazy.

Article URL: http://www.bostonherald.com/sports/football/other_nfl/view.bg?articleid=1138912


AGA Medical Corporation Partners With Professional Football Player Tedy Bruschi for National Stroke Awareness Program
Thursday December 18, 5:27 pm ET



MINNEAPOLIS, Dec. 18 /PRNewswire/ -- AGA Medical Corporation announced today the launch of a stroke awareness initiative in partnership with Tedy Bruschi, a professional football player who suffered a stroke in February 2005. The unique partnership will foster a series of educational programs dedicated to stroke awareness and prevention.

"Prior to my stroke, I had no knowledge of stroke risk factors," said Tedy Bruschi. "I was able to bounce back from my adversity because of the immense medical and emotional support I received during my recovery period. I wasn't aware of the stroke warning signs and I want others to benefit from what I went through. That is why I look forward to partnering with AGA Medical to raise awareness of stroke."

Stroke, defined as a sudden injury to the brain caused by a blood vessel bursting or becoming blocked, is the nation's number 3 cause of death behind heart disease and cancer. The American Heart Association reports that each year, about 700,000 Americans suffer from a stroke. One-third of stroke victims are under 65, and even children can suffer a stroke.

"We are proud to partner with Tedy to develop a comprehensive stroke awareness and education effort," said John Barr, chief executive officer of AGA Medical. "Tedy's motivation to succeed in spite of his hardship serves as an inspiration to stroke survivors, and we are excited to direct our combined efforts toward raising awareness of this life-threatening disease."

About Tedy Bruschi

Coming off the success of winning his third league championship and playing in the annual league all-star game in February of 2005, Tedy unexpectedly experienced a stroke. On the advice of his physician, a device from AGA Medical was prescribed and implanted as part of Tedy's treatment. After several months of extensive rehabilitation and recovery, Tedy was medically cleared to resume playing football less than a year later. Today, in addition to his continued success on the field, Tedy dedicates a considerable part of his time off the field toward raising stroke awareness and funds for stroke research.

To learn more about Tedy and the warning signs of stroke, visit http://www.amplatzer.com/strokeawareness.

AGA Medical Corporation Partners With Professional Football Player Tedy Bruschi for National Stroke Awareness Program: Financial News - Yahoo! Finance



 

 

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